Lower control arms. How to determine new length needed for lift?

Willys2Gladiator

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Looking for info or a formula for how much to lengthen adjustable control arms when adding lift. I have 1.75" front lift and would like to get caster back to stock as close as possible.

Thanks! Searched but didn't find anything. If already a thread please post link.



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Mac

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I have pair I bought from Benny at all Mopar parts, just need to find the time to install, I have a 1.75” spacer in the front currently. It isn’t too bad but figure it can’t hurt to add a little caster.
 
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Willys2Gladiator

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I have pair I bought from Benny at all Mopar parts, just need to find the time to install, I have a 1.75” spacer in the front currently. It isn’t too bad but figure it can’t hurt to add a little caster.
Agreed. Caster us good and if I can improve the steering at all I'm in.
Ordered Core in black. Will make it 3/16" longer than stock.
 

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Best way is to put it on an alignment machine.

I’d start with the 1/4” longer and adjust as needed. Also to help with steering I wouldn’t stay within the stock spec.

I bumped my caster up to 6* and it’s much better. I also added a little toe.

F08E3C6B-BD8A-4358-AFA7-404A4F95D6E7.jpeg
1C36B8E3-A538-4FFA-A229-3CE1DE699CEF.jpeg
00822762-DD65-44C0-AFE4-D68629779A37.jpeg
 
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Best way it to put on an alignment machine.

I’d start with the 1/4” longer and adjust as needed. Also to help with steering I wouldn’t stay within the stock spec.

I bumped my caster up to 6* and it’s much better. I also added a little toe.

F08E3C6B-BD8A-4358-AFA7-404A4F95D6E7.jpeg
1C36B8E3-A538-4FFA-A229-3CE1DE699CEF.jpeg
00822762-DD65-44C0-AFE4-D68629779A37.jpeg
Thank you for this info.
Looking forward to dialing it in as well.

What brand did you end up going with?
 

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Thank you for this info.
Looking forward to dialing it in as well.

What brand did you end up going with?
I went with Synergy. At the very least go with some that you can adjust on the vehicle. Makes adjustment much easier.
 

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I went with Synergy. At the very least go with some that you can adjust on the vehicle. Makes adjustment much easier.
Although technically correct, I’m going to disagree with this. Considering the OP is only planning to lift the front 1.75”, adding a set of 1/4” longer fixed Mopar arms would be simpler, easier, and more cost effective. If one was building a more complex system, yes, adjustable arms would be better. In this case, I would keep it simple. To each his own though.
 

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Best way is to put it on an alignment machine.

I’d start with the 1/4” longer and adjust as needed. Also to help with steering I wouldn’t stay within the stock spec.

I bumped my caster up to 6* and it’s much better. I also added a little toe.

F08E3C6B-BD8A-4358-AFA7-404A4F95D6E7.jpeg
1C36B8E3-A538-4FFA-A229-3CE1DE699CEF.jpeg
00822762-DD65-44C0-AFE4-D68629779A37.jpeg
Bigger tires, wider stance - more toe helps to offset that. Caster will help it want to "self-center" after a turn.
 

CTFriel

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Although technically correct, I’m going to disagree with this. Considering the OP is only planning to lift the front 1.75”, adding a set of 1/4” longer fixed Mopar arms would be simpler, easier, and more cost effective. If one was building a more complex system, yes, adjustable arms would be better. In this case, I would keep it simple. To each his own though.
sounds good. I don’t know a single person that has kept their Jeep in its initial form. Always changing, so why not allow for that up front and only spend the money once? To each his own I guess.
 

brianinca

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Doesn't take but a half-hour if you have the simple tools. Do it!

I have pair I bought from Benny at all Mopar parts, just need to find the time to install, I have a 1.75” spacer in the front currently. It isn’t too bad but figure it can’t hurt to add a little caster.
 
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brianinca

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I agree very much. For $61 and 30 minutes, it's dirt cheap. I just used them to band-aid the broke-ass steering box with a bunch of caster and to get some more sane toe settings so my front tires don't get eaten up. Stock JTR springs and height.

$400+ for fully adjustable LCA's is a higher bar than "oh I needed a good torque wrench anyway".

Edit to add: PM Benny @AllMoparParts.com for the parts and shipping discount.

Although technically correct, I’m going to disagree with this. Considering the OP is only planning to lift the front 1.75”, adding a set of 1/4” longer fixed Mopar arms would be simpler, easier, and more cost effective. If one was building a more complex system, yes, adjustable arms would be better. In this case, I would keep it simple. To each his own though.
 

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Doesn't take but a half-hour if you have the simple tools. Do it!
Doing one at a time you don't even have to struggle as they are right down there accessible without busting your back, head or arm.
I may go that route one day but in my situation I think my winch and bumper and skid plate offset a lot of the lift.
Wish I could find someone who would measure a bone-stock overland up to the bottom of the fender opening to see how mine compares. I lost my notes that I took a year ago when I measured stock height to see how much payload set the truck down. Bummer.
I added Rubicon springs which gained me about an inch as measured at the bumper, likely a bit less at the wheel, then put on the winch, skid plate and bumper that dropped it about a half inch, the put 3/4" spacers under it and lost track of the STOCK setting to see how much different it sits now from bone stock.
If there's enough difference I'm considering the lower control arms to add some caster back.
 
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Willys2Gladiator

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Doing one at a time you don't even have to struggle as they are right down there accessible without busting your back, head or arm.
I may go that route one day but in my situation I think my winch and bumper and skid plate offset a lot of the lift.
Wish I could find someone who would measure a bone-stock overland up to the bottom of the fender opening to see how mine compares. I lost my notes that I took a year ago when I measured stock height to see how much payload set the truck down. Bummer.
I added Rubicon springs which gained me about an inch as measured at the bumper, likely a bit less at the wheel, then put on the winch, skid plate and bumper that dropped it about a half inch, the put 3/4" spacers under it and lost track of the STOCK setting to see how much different it sits now from bone stock.
If there's enough difference I'm considering the lower control arms to add some caster back.
Swing into your nearest dealer with a tape measure.
 

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