What Reduction To Payload Does Each Option Cause?

Snake Eyes

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2022
Threads
9
Messages
522
Reaction score
812
Location
Las Vegas
Vehicle(s)
2011 Toyota FJ Cruiser
I guess it boils down to you. I work in a legal regulatory arena and we have an mantra….just because you can does not mean you should.

Can you tow at max…yes. The question only you can answer is whether you should :) Some say no, some decide yes.

My max tow can do 7650 tow with 765 max hitch. I am looking at a 4300 GVWR trailer with a 409 hitch and 20 feet long. That means my hitch has the possibility of being around 645 which will keep me 120 below max or 84%.

 
Last edited:
OP
OP
RJinPV

RJinPV

Well-Known Member
First Name
Roger
Joined
Jul 19, 2022
Threads
5
Messages
200
Reaction score
256
Location
Southern Cal
Vehicle(s)
2023 JT Rubicon, 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
Occupation
Retired
Yes, my doorjamb sticker says 1216 lbs. Mine is a 2021, though. Maybe they got heavier for '22. I don't think much changed, but it wouldn't surprise me. GVWR is 6250, and payload is 1216. Empty weight is in the very high 4ks, but I don't feel like going out and looking at my registration right now to see what exactly the empty weight was now though 😉. Payload is definitely 1216 on mine (or it was before the 35s wheels, and skid plates, anyway)
Interesting. I found a website that lists the '21 JTR payload at 1250 and the '22 JTR payload at 1200 lbs (not 1160 which is on the Jeep website). However the curb weight, Gross Trailer Weight (GTW) and GCWR for each year are the same. GCWR-GTW-Curb weight should equal payload capacity if all of those numbers are calculated with the same assumptions (eg. fuel tank full or not).
 

dcmdon

Well-Known Member
First Name
Don
Joined
Mar 31, 2021
Threads
57
Messages
3,269
Reaction score
3,771
Location
Boston Metro-West, Northern NH
Vehicle(s)
.
You are over thinking the small stuff and under thinking teh big stuff.

A max tow is not going to tow noticeably better than a Rubicon or Mojave with air bags. Its the same truck, and 5 or 60 lbs here or there won't make any difference.

If you think about it, the total weight of truck and trailer is going to be somewhere in the 12,000 range. Do you really think 100 lbs (unless its right on the tongue) is going to make an appreciable difference?? 100 lbs is 0.8% of the weight of the truck and trailer combination. I would defy anyone to feel any difference in how this combination towed.

The truck may or may not be inside published numbers. But it will be working hard. It will be relatively unpleasant to drive for long distances or on the highway and will be fine at lower speeds. If you exercise good judgement, it will be safe.

Your tolerance and threshold for unpleasantness probably means more than anything else.
 
OP
OP
RJinPV

RJinPV

Well-Known Member
First Name
Roger
Joined
Jul 19, 2022
Threads
5
Messages
200
Reaction score
256
Location
Southern Cal
Vehicle(s)
2023 JT Rubicon, 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
Occupation
Retired
I guess it boils down to you. I work in a legal regulatory arena and we have an mantra….just because you can does not mean you should.

Can you tow at max…yes. The question only you can answer is whether you should :) Some say no, some decide yes.

My max tow can do 7650 tow with 765 max hitch. I am looking at a 4300 GVWR trailer with a 409 hitch and 20 feet long. That means my hitch has the possibility of being around 645 which will keep me 120 below max or 84%.
I agree that margin is always better. However, Jeep comes up with the tongue weight spec as simply 10% of the gross tow weight. So, the tongue weight is not the primary number to worry about. One reason is because a weight distribution hitch can shift some of the weight from the rear axle to the front axle. So, if the tongue weight is over the 10% for the GTW but the payload weight is still less than the payload limit on doorjamb sticker, it's still within spec. The numbers you really have to worry about are axle weights, total payload (or GVW), gross trailer weight, and the gross combined weight, relative to their respective specifications. In your case, I think your margin is really the ratio of (your Jeep's loaded weight + 4300 GVWR trailer)/12800 (max tow GCWR). If you fully load your jeep to the GVWR then it's (6250+4300)/12800=82%. But I guess were' splitting hairs....
 

Gvsukids

Well-Known Member
First Name
Justin
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Threads
21
Messages
3,566
Reaction score
3,237
Location
Grand Rapids
Website
www.youtube.com
Vehicle(s)
2020 Gladiator Sport S Max Tow
Occupation
Delivery Driver


ReverendZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Zebulon
Joined
Feb 12, 2021
Threads
1
Messages
76
Reaction score
68
Location
56465
Vehicle(s)
2021 Gladiator Sport S Mack's Toe Nacho
Occupation
Powersports Technical Support
Here's a max tow door sticker 21 model for reference.

1661343654658424107418389750602.jpg
 

ReverendZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Zebulon
Joined
Feb 12, 2021
Threads
1
Messages
76
Reaction score
68
Location
56465
Vehicle(s)
2021 Gladiator Sport S Mack's Toe Nacho
Occupation
Powersports Technical Support
OP
OP
RJinPV

RJinPV

Well-Known Member
First Name
Roger
Joined
Jul 19, 2022
Threads
5
Messages
200
Reaction score
256
Location
Southern Cal
Vehicle(s)
2023 JT Rubicon, 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
Occupation
Retired
The little one?

Showed 1500ish or so. Didn't give me a trailer rating though 😕
The stickers don't show a trailer rating. You need to go to the owner's manual for that and look up your model in the table on either page 214 or 215 (page numbers per the electronic pdf file I downloaded).
 


ReverendZ

Well-Known Member
First Name
Zebulon
Joined
Feb 12, 2021
Threads
1
Messages
76
Reaction score
68
Location
56465
Vehicle(s)
2021 Gladiator Sport S Mack's Toe Nacho
Occupation
Powersports Technical Support
For sure, I read that thing cover to cover digitally before I got mine off the transport truck. 7650 if memory serves.
But yes, as some would say, rtfm 😆
 
OP
OP
RJinPV

RJinPV

Well-Known Member
First Name
Roger
Joined
Jul 19, 2022
Threads
5
Messages
200
Reaction score
256
Location
Southern Cal
Vehicle(s)
2023 JT Rubicon, 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
Occupation
Retired
Still trying to answer my original question... so I compiled data from 4 Gladiators on my dealer's lot. Attached is a table with the numbers. What did it tell me? Unknown factors influence the payload number. Rubicon #1 and #2 are outfitted the same (except for paint color) and their payload numbers differ by 49 lbs. Skipping the leather seats, the cold weather group, the steel bumper and the headliner might save something like 30 to 70 lbs, per Rubicon #3. The Mojave has the fewest options but the biggest payload loss, which again points to random unknown factors. I'm guessing my number will be 1100 lbs +/-50. As @dcmdon pointed out, I'm worrying the small stuff. Where I'm at relative to the GCWR is the main thing to keep an eye on.
Screen Shot 2022-08-24 at 5.18.50 PM.png
 

Mr._Bill

Well-Known Member
First Name
Bill
Joined
Jul 22, 2019
Threads
25
Messages
3,742
Reaction score
3,511
Location
North Las Vegas, NV
Vehicle(s)
2020 Jeep Gladiator Overland - 2013 Nissan Leaf SV
Vehicle Showcase
1
Everything has a weight cost. You're spending time trying derive an answer to a question that can't be answered. You ordered a truck with the options you wanted. It's possibly the wrong truck for your needs, but that's something you have to decide. The payload capacity will be automatically determined, based on the build, by the computer at the factory. The choices in options may make a difference of a hundred pounds. It's something you can't control. Unless you order a stripped down model, it won't be a significant difference, and that would just leave you with an uncomfortable vehicle to travel in. Based on the information already provided, you are going to be at the limit, or over. You'll have to learn how to be a slower vehicle in the right lane, and drive as safely as possible. Don't plan to be in any hurry when towing.
 
OP
OP
RJinPV

RJinPV

Well-Known Member
First Name
Roger
Joined
Jul 19, 2022
Threads
5
Messages
200
Reaction score
256
Location
Southern Cal
Vehicle(s)
2023 JT Rubicon, 2017 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
Occupation
Retired
Everything has a weight cost. You're spending time trying derive an answer to a question that can't be answered. You ordered a truck with the options you wanted. It's possibly the wrong truck for your needs, but that's something you have to decide. The payload capacity will be automatically determined, based on the build, by the computer at the factory. The choices in options may make a difference of a hundred pounds. It's something you can't control. Unless you order a stripped down model, it won't be a significant difference, and that would just leave you with an uncomfortable vehicle to travel in. Based on the information already provided, you are going to be at the limit, or over. You'll have to learn how to be a slower vehicle in the right lane, and drive as safely as possible. Don't plan to be in any hurry when towing.
It's pretty clear that the capacity is not automatically determined by option list. There are some other factors involved. This seems clear by Rubicon #1 and #2 data. By the way, I'm confident I won't be over the GCWR. The GVWR is another story. I'll likely be over by 5-10%. Been there before and it should be ok. If not then I downsize the trailer or do something else.....
 

Bobzdar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2019
Threads
7
Messages
507
Reaction score
607
Location
Richmond
Vehicle(s)
2020 Gladiator Rubicon, 1989 grand wagoneer
I guess it boils down to you. I work in a legal regulatory arena and we have an mantra….just because you can does not mean you should.

Can you tow at max…yes. The question only you can answer is whether you should :) Some say no, some decide yes.

My max tow can do 7650 tow with 765 max hitch. I am looking at a 4300 GVWR trailer with a 409 hitch and 20 feet long. That means my hitch has the possibility of being around 645 which will keep me 120 below max or 84%.
The ratings are the 'should' limits. They're fully capable of more in the right conditions, and those 'should' limits have a safety factor. That's why they're published. What the actual limits are, nobody, except the engineers, know, and will depend on conditions. You can probably tow 2-3x the limits on flat ground on a cool day at 20mph. But in extreme conditions (ie Davis Dam Grade test), the posted limits are what it can (and should) be able to do without issue. That's why it's fully warrantied up to those limits.

 

 
Top