2020 Gladiator Towing (Overland)

sroberts1519

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Ugh. So just so I'm clear the weight of all passengers and cargo, plus the hitch weight of the trailer (10% of the total trailer weight loaded), and the weight of the hitch itself gets subtracted from my max cargo capacity (1078lbs)? In my case that puts me over by around 250lbs. Based on your post earlier, am I to understand the excess weight can be distributed back to the trailer to bring me under the 1078lb limit? I read somewhere that a WDH would distribute the hitch weight across the two axles of the vehicle as well as the axles of the trailer. I just can't wrap my brain around how that affects payload (cargo capacity).

I hate asking these questions because I feel dumb. I just want to feel comfortable before I hit the road with my wife and kids in the vehicle.
I have been in the same boat as you the past few weeks. I have a stock JT Overland with tow package, and my JT CCC is just below 1100 pounds (cant remember exact number off the top of my head), i.e. JT GVWR is 5800.

Hear is the conclusion that I came to:
on my spreadsheet calculations for my JT I have:
curb weight + me and the wife + 60 pounds misc + Trailer tongue weight.
For trailer I have:
dry weight (4200) + 75 pounds for WDH + battery, propane, a little bit of water, etc. Trailer wet weight about 4800. Trailer tongue weight = trailer weight multiplied by 10% and then added 30 pounds (WDH will add some to tongue weight).

I came out to be slightly over the JT GVWR.

Then my logic was: the WDH will help JT GVWR some. I also believe that the Overland reduced CCC (GVWR) is because they put a softer suspension on it (overland is the city driver version). I just put $500 down on a Freedom Express 192RB. It is still in the factory being built, with no delivery date :(

Anyways, once I get the trailer delivered, WDH setup properly, I will measure (height and weight) of the truck squat, both front and rear axle. If I think there is too much squat, my back up plan is to put airbags on the rear shocks.

I am sure I will probably get a lot of advice telling me I shouldnt do this, but then again, I have heard some people say you absolutely need a 1 ton dually to tow a tent trailer safely. lol

Btw, 95% of my towing will be in (flat) Oklahoma. And I plan to tow at a safe speed of 55-60 mph. I am in no rush to get to my destination :)





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gwpeaks

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I have been in the same boat as you the past few weeks. I have a stock JT Overland with tow package, and my JT CCC is just below 1100 pounds (cant remember exact number off the top of my head), i.e. JT GVWR is 5800.

Hear is the conclusion that I came to:
on my spreadsheet calculations for my JT I have:
curb weight + me and the wife + 60 pounds misc + Trailer tongue weight.
For trailer I have:
dry weight (4200) + 75 pounds for WDH + battery, propane, a little bit of water, etc. Trailer wet weight about 4800. Trailer tongue weight = trailer weight multiplied by 10% and then added 30 pounds (WDH will add some to tongue weight).

I came out to be slightly over the JT GVWR.

Then my logic was: the WDH will help JT GVWR some. I also believe that the Overland reduced CCC (GVWR) is because they put a softer suspension on it (overland is the city driver version). I just put $500 down on a Freedom Express 192RB. It is still in the factory being built, with no delivery date :(

Anyways, once I get the trailer delivered, WDH setup properly, I will measure (height and weight) of the truck squat, both front and rear axle. If I think there is too much squat, my back up plan is to put airbags on the rear shocks.

I am sure I will probably get a lot of advice telling me I shouldnt do this, but then again, I have heard some people say you absolutely need a 1 ton dually to tow a tent trailer safely. lol

Btw, 95% of my towing will be in (flat) Oklahoma. And I plan to tow at a safe speed of 55-60 mph. I am in no rush to get to my destination :)
So you are counting the weight of the WDH as part of the 4800lbs. and not an additional 75lbs. of "hitch weight"? I'm following the same basic formula as you but I added 100lbs. to the 456lb. hitch weight of my trailer making it 556lbs. If I figure it in with the wet weight of the trailer I can make it work (I was figuring 400lbs. of stuff we would pack without filling the water tank).
 

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Then my logic was: the WDH will help JT GVWR some. I also believe that the Overland reduced CCC (GVWR) is because they put a softer suspension on it (overland is the city driver version). I just put $500 down on a Freedom Express 192RB.

I am sure I will probably get a lot of advice telling me I shouldnt do this, but then again, I have heard some people say you absolutely need a 1 ton dually to tow a tent trailer safely. lol

Btw, 95% of my towing will be in (flat) Oklahoma. And I plan to tow at a safe speed of 55-60 mph. I am in no rush to get to my destination :)
NO - if that was the case then a person could put max tow springs under an Overland and have the same capacity as the Sport S max tow. It does not work that way.
There's more raw weight to an Overland than a lighter Sport S - as far as PAYLOAD.
Then you have axle ratio and other considerations. There's a lot more goes into it than how soft the suspension is.
With your logic, then my Overland will soon be able to carry the same payload as a max tow as I'm putting max tow springs under it.
And that absolutely is not the case. I still must be aware of my PAYLOAD sticker number - it's just that it won't SAG as badly with the load in it. It will ride differently.
Rather than retype everything I've typed before - and others have typed before in other threads, I'd suggest searching for the threads of last winter that covered this very well.
Axle ratios, the curb weight of the vehicle (which is static, does not change - what changes is what you put in the vehicle - but the curb weight is still curb weight (unless you put on heavier bumpers and wheels and tires that weigh more than factory - curb weight ist sitll just the vehicle without people and luggage)

So you take curb weight, add in winch, rack, light bar, off-road lights and so on, and that becomes your vehicles basic weight now.
Then you figure in passengers, coolers, tools and so on - those are payload.
Those combined can't exceed the maximum weight the vehicle is rated for.
And if you tow - yeah, the tongue weight is added to the payload in the box of the truck.
You can move the coolers to the trailer, but now you've added weight to the trailer and that goes against what the vehicle is rated to TOW. (and still counts against your maximum combined weight.
It all counts against your total weight, Gross vehicle combined weight - no matter where you put that weight, if it's on wheels that your engine is pulling along, it's the GVCW (I think I have the acronym right)
You can't simply say that a hitch will make things better - that weight is still there, still applies to the TOTAL WEIGHT (see chart I posted - doesn't matter where the weight is - you have to abide by that).
A weight distribution hitch isn't magic - your engine still has to pull it all, and your brakes still have to stop it all. It mostly levels things out. IF you get too goofy with one, you can actually cause trailer issues. (no one that makes an aluminum trailer, for example, will want you to use a weight distributing hitch because of the stress on the trailer tongue and frame in the wrong places - campers, fine - steel, different animal - but still......)

So you have to watch axle weights, gross combined weight, TOW capacity, payload.
And people wonder whiy some OTR drivers get cranky LOL They have weight limits - axle limits and more. They may be able to be, just for example, 80,000 pounds total weight, but that weight had better not be too heavy on the wrong axles or they have to shift the cargo.
 

sroberts1519

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NO - if that was the case then a person could put max tow springs under an Overland and have the same capacity as the Sport S max tow. It does not work that way.
There's more raw weight to an Overland than a lighter Sport S - as far as PAYLOAD.
Then you have axle ratio and other considerations. There's a lot more goes into it than how soft the suspension is.
With your logic, then my Overland will soon be able to carry the same payload as a max tow as I'm putting max tow springs under it.
And that absolutely is not the case. I still must be aware of my PAYLOAD sticker number - it's just that it won't SAG as badly with the load in it. It will ride differently.
Rather than retype everything I've typed before - and others have typed before in other threads, I'd suggest searching for the threads of last winter that covered this very well.
Axle ratios, the curb weight of the vehicle (which is static, does not change - what changes is what you put in the vehicle - but the curb weight is still curb weight (unless you put on heavier bumpers and wheels and tires that weigh more than factory - curb weight ist sitll just the vehicle without people and luggage)

So you take curb weight, add in winch, rack, light bar, off-road lights and so on, and that becomes your vehicles basic weight now.
Then you figure in passengers, coolers, tools and so on - those are payload.
Those combined can't exceed the maximum weight the vehicle is rated for.
And if you tow - yeah, the tongue weight is added to the payload in the box of the truck.
You can move the coolers to the trailer, but now you've added weight to the trailer and that goes against what the vehicle is rated to TOW. (and still counts against your maximum combined weight.
It all counts against your total weight, Gross vehicle combined weight - no matter where you put that weight, if it's on wheels that your engine is pulling along, it's the GVCW (I think I have the acronym right)
You can't simply say that a hitch will make things better - that weight is still there, still applies to the TOTAL WEIGHT (see chart I posted - doesn't matter where the weight is - you have to abide by that).
A weight distribution hitch isn't magic - your engine still has to pull it all, and your brakes still have to stop it all. It mostly levels things out. IF you get too goofy with one, you can actually cause trailer issues. (no one that makes an aluminum trailer, for example, will want you to use a weight distributing hitch because of the stress on the trailer tongue and frame in the wrong places - campers, fine - steel, different animal - but still......)

So you have to watch axle weights, gross combined weight, TOW capacity, payload.
And people wonder whiy some OTR drivers get cranky LOL They have weight limits - axle limits and more. They may be able to be, just for example, 80,000 pounds total weight, but that weight had better not be too heavy on the wrong axles or they have to shift the cargo.
so with my overland, I have a GCVWR of 11100, which according to Jeep, my 3.73 gears can move that much weight. but if I go over 5800 pounds of gvwr (with no trailer attached), say 6500 pounds, my 3.73 gears can't move that weight? So according to Jeep, my JT Overland can move GCVWR of 11100, but cant move 6500 pounds if no trailer is attached?

With my trailer I have on order, by my calculations I will be atleast 1000 pounds under tow capacity, atleast 1000 pounds under GCVWR, but maybe marginally over GVWR of the JT. If I dont like the ride, I may try adding air bags to the back. That is all I was saying. I have never heard how differential gear ratios affect suspension - I am a licensed engineer, but that is a new one on me.....

you mentioned winch and a bunch of other add ons. I never, ever plan on adding any of that stuff to my JT, thus, stuff not on my JT should not be added to my calculations.

btw, I have also considered axle weight ratings, tire ratings, plus a whole bunch of other ratings for parts that are on my JT Overland.

Would I consider pulling that heavy of a trailer in the rocky mountains. nope, no way. In oklahoma, different animal.

But my disclaimer is every one should only do what they feel comfortable with. If you are not comfortable with it, dont do it.
 

sroberts1519

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So you are counting the weight of the WDH as part of the 4800lbs. and not an additional 75lbs. of "hitch weight"? I'm following the same basic formula as you but I added 100lbs. to the 456lb. hitch weight of my trailer making it 556lbs. If I figure it in with the wet weight of the trailer I can make it work (I was figuring 400lbs. of stuff we would pack without filling the water tank).
I would offer more advice but the weight police have already come out, claiming I dont know the difference between dry weight, gvwr, gcvwr, tow capacities, engineering processes to determine specifications, etc.

Years ago I had long discussions with the weight police on a different forum. Everyone said I was crazy then when I was towing a 3500 pound tent trailer behind a jeep liberty rated to tow 5000 pounds. The argument back then was because of the liberty short wheel base it should never be used to tow a rv, regardless of jeep 5000 pound tow capacity. I towed that trailer for a few years, thousands and thousands of miles across oklahoma with no problems. The real kicker was when I was told that I shouldn't use a WDH on a liberty because they claimed the liberty was a unibody. The liberty owners manual clearly stated that towing a trailer over 2500 pounds with a WDH voided all warranties on the vehicle. I guess the weight police know better then Jeep engineers did back then.....
 

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Sorry, not how it works. It's not "can it move it". There's a whole lot more to the equation. Too many try to over-simplify it. It's not about it can or can't move it, it can or can't pull it. It's about heat, axle ratings, braking, engine load, gearing, just a whole lot of things considered.
You are trying to make it all about weight and it's not. If it was, then if you removed 200 pounds of weight from the truck, it could pull 200 pounds more in a trailer. Or if the trailer was 200 pounds lighter, you could put 200 pounds more in the truck. That's not really how it works.

>>I have never heard how differential gear ratios affect suspension - I am a licensed engineer, but that is a new one on me..... <<
Gear ratios don't impact suspension - but you have to consider that the Overland has NARROWER axles. Sport S max tow and Rubicon have WIDER axles, besides the lower ratio. The wider axles DO impact how it handles and what the tow rating would be.

>> I will be atleast 1000 pounds under tow capacity, atleast 1000 pounds under GCVWR, but maybe marginally over GVWR of the JT. If I dont like the ride, I may try adding air bags to the back <<

Over weight in the vehicle - over GVWR - then you get into issues - legal and otherwise. Again you are trying to make it about ride, comfort and height - it's not about comfort. You are looking at it wrong. You can't resolve that with air bags!! If you are over, you are over. IF it was so darned simple a person could add heavier springs - and that will NOT help you carry more weight. You can't add air bags and be legal.
 

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Ok... So more clarity.

I weighed my rig today at a CAT scale with a fully topped gas tank (Went from the pump to the scale, Me not in it because those scale intercoms are setup for semi's not JTs!)

The results:

Steer Axle: 2,700#
Drive Axle: 2,460#
GrosVW: 5,160#

GVWR: 6,250#

So, true cargo and people capacity with a full tank of gas of my exact rig is: 1,090#

Now, here's my math if someone wants to make doubly sure that my assumptions are all correct:

Curb weight with a full tank: 5,160#
Me and the Mrs.: + 350# (Includes clothes, purse according to Mrs.)
Crap that needs to be in the bed or cab: +40# (Laptop, camera bag, etc)
New Curb Weight: 5,550#
Available Tongue Weight (max): 700# (Well now isn't that a coincidence)

Then, there's more:
Weight of all aftermarket parts: +50# (Swaps, etc. based on experience and manufacturer conversations)

Realistic New Curb Weight: 5,600#
Realistic Available Max Tongue: 650#
GCWR: 12,450#
Realistic Available Max Trailer Weight: 6,850# (This is not realistic due to the 10% rule on Tongue)

SO, bottom line. In my specific case: I can legally tow with the above assumptions:

6,490#GTW and 649# Tongue.

I would then estimate that my comfortable towing level to be:

5,900# GTW and 590# Tongue (but with a bias toward moving the tongue weight to 12-13% of GTW)

Does that math check out? If so, I will also make a new post with the process flow here because I believe there are a LOT of new JT owners that would benefit from this very level of detail.

Cheers!
B
B, Your numbers make sense. Remember if your total trailer weight is 6490# when you connect it to your TV and put 649#'s of that weight on the hitch, you can then subtract that 649#s from your trailers total weight. In other words, if your TV curb weight is 5600# and the TT curb weight is 5900# your Combined total weight is 11,500#s. 590#s of the total trailer weight moves to the TV so the total trailer axle(s) weight will be (and always was) 5310#s.
Not sure how clear I made that but just don't make the mistake of adding the tongue weight twice, once as tongue weight on the TV and twice as being already calculated in total trailer weight.
 
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gwpeaks

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I would offer more advice but the weight police have already come out, claiming I dont know the difference between dry weight, gvwr, gcvwr, tow capacities, engineering processes to determine specifications, etc.

Years ago I had long discussions with the weight police on a different forum. Everyone said I was crazy then when I was towing a 3500 pound tent trailer behind a jeep liberty rated to tow 5000 pounds. The argument back then was because of the liberty short wheel base it should never be used to tow a rv, regardless of jeep 5000 pound tow capacity. I towed that trailer for a few years, thousands and thousands of miles across oklahoma with no problems. The real kicker was when I was told that I shouldn't use a WDH on a liberty because they claimed the liberty was a unibody. The liberty owners manual clearly stated that towing a trailer over 2500 pounds with a WDH voided all warranties on the vehicle. I guess the weight police know better then Jeep engineers did back then.....
I've never towed anything, not even a lawn mower. My family will be with me on these trips so I value your opinion regardless of what others think. For what it's worth, my numbers are below:
Trailer weight - 4500lbs dry
Hitch weight - 456lbs dry
Tow capacity - 600lbs
GCVWR - 11100lbs
Payload - 1078lbs

My conservative estimate for all passengers (dogs and people) and cargo is roughly 675lbs.

We won't be filling the tanks on the trailer as we will only be camping at sites with full hookups.

What are your thoughts on those numbers using a WDH and sway control? I am supposed to get this trailer tomorrow (pay for it anyway) so I'm reaching out for opinions now in case I need to divert. By my calculations, we will not load over 400lbs in the camper and it appears we will be roughly 150lbs over the max payload.
 
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Sorry, not how it works. It's not "can it move it". There's a whole lot more to the equation. Too many try to over-simplify it. It's not about it can or can't move it, it can or can't pull it. It's about heat, axle ratings, braking, engine load, gearing, just a whole lot of things considered.
You are trying to make it all about weight and it's not. If it was, then if you removed 200 pounds of weight from the truck, it could pull 200 pounds more in a trailer. Or if the trailer was 200 pounds lighter, you could put 200 pounds more in the truck. That's not really how it works.

>>I have never heard how differential gear ratios affect suspension - I am a licensed engineer, but that is a new one on me..... <<
Gear ratios don't impact suspension - but you have to consider that the Overland has NARROWER axles. Sport S max tow and Rubicon have WIDER axles, besides the lower ratio. The wider axles DO impact how it handles and what the tow rating would be.

>> I will be atleast 1000 pounds under tow capacity, atleast 1000 pounds under GCVWR, but maybe marginally over GVWR of the JT. If I dont like the ride, I may try adding air bags to the back <<

Over weight in the vehicle - over GVWR - then you get into issues - legal and otherwise. Again you are trying to make it about ride, comfort and height - it's not about comfort. You are looking at it wrong. You can't resolve that with air bags!! If you are over, you are over. IF it was so darned simple a person could add heavier springs - and that will NOT help you carry more weight. You can't add air bags and be legal.
Please see my reply to sroberts below. I would appreciate your opinion on those numbers as well. I realize there are other threads on this topic but I've spent hours and hours combing the Internet and I'm still unsure if I can safely tow this trailer or not. Bear in mind, I have never towed anything at all in my life so ALL of this is foreign to me.
 

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I've never towed anything, not even a lawn mower. My family will be with me on these trips so I value your opinion regardless of what others think. For what it's worth, my numbers are below:
Trailer weight - 4500lbs dry
Hitch weight - 456lbs dry
Tow capacity - 600lbs
GCVWR - 11100lbs
Payload - 1078lbs

My conservative estimate for all passengers (dogs and people) and cargo is roughly 675lbs.

We won't be filling the tanks on the trailer as we will only be camping at sites with full hookups.

What are your thoughts on those numbers using a WDH and sway control? I am supposed to get this trailer tomorrow (pay for it anyway) so I'm reaching out for opinions now in case I need to divert. By my calculations, we will not load over 400lbs in the camper and it appears we will be roughly 150lbs over the max payload.
First off, the only heavy trailer I have ever towed was that tent trailer. There are lots of people here that have towed alot more than me. the first time I towed my tent trailer I didnt have a WDH. It was a white knuckle experience. It was the last time I pulled it without WDH and away control
What I am saying is I am a form believer of any rv over 3000 pounds should have WDH amd sway control, regardless of tow vehicle.

I thought about a 4500 pound trailer for the last few weeks. Ultimately I decided a 4200 tandem axle would probably be better than a 3500 single axle.

We could not find any trailers under 3500 to 3800 dry that we liked. There really isnt much tongue weight difference between a 3500 dry trailer and a 4200 dry trailer, using the 10% to 12% rule. I also plan on towing with basically dry tanks.

You like me will be at or slightly over gvwr of the JT. Even with many of the 3500.pound trailers, that will pretty much be true

I won't be towing in the mountains and I dont drive fast when I tow. But, asking me as a no body is it safe to tow with that with your family? I would say no, dont do anything over published specifications. But, I am about to tow a trailer that I know i will probably be over the JT gvwr......
 

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B, Your numbers make sense. Remember if your total trailer weight is 6490# when you connect it to your TV and put 649#'s of that weight on the hitch, you can then subtract that 649#s from your trailers total weight. In other words, if your TV curb weight is 5600# and the TT curb weight is 5900# your Combined total weight is 11,500#s. 590#s of the total trailer weight moves to the TV so the total trailer axle(s) weight will be (and always was) 5310#s.
Not sure how clear I made that but just don't make the mistake of adding the tongue weight twice, once as tongue weight on the TV and twice as being already calculated in total trailer weight.
I've attached a screen shot of my weight distribution calculator.

Good catch, I did remember to leave the tongue weight off of the final calculation for GCW. I love Excel...

Towing Calculator Screen Grab 1.png
 

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so with my overland, I have a GCVWR of 11100, which according to Jeep, my 3.73 gears can move that much weight. but if I go over 5800 pounds of gvwr (with no trailer attached), say 6500 pounds, my 3.73 gears can't move that weight? So according to Jeep, my JT Overland can move GCVWR of 11100, but cant move 6500 pounds if no trailer is attached?

With my trailer I have on order, by my calculations I will be atleast 1000 pounds under tow capacity, atleast 1000 pounds under GCVWR, but maybe marginally over GVWR of the JT. If I dont like the ride, I may try adding air bags to the back. That is all I was saying. I have never heard how differential gear ratios affect suspension - I am a licensed engineer, but that is a new one on me.....

you mentioned winch and a bunch of other add ons. I never, ever plan on adding any of that stuff to my JT, thus, stuff not on my JT should not be added to my calculations.

btw, I have also considered axle weight ratings, tire ratings, plus a whole bunch of other ratings for parts that are on my JT Overland.

Would I consider pulling that heavy of a trailer in the rocky mountains. nope, no way. In oklahoma, different animal.

But my disclaimer is every one should only do what they feel comfortable with. If you are not comfortable with it, dont do it.
SRoberts, as a licensed engineer, most of us here should be asking you about weights and measures, I know I should.
I agree with your disclaimer, and that if we stay at or under all weight rating limits we can reasonably expect that the OEM has engineered the vehicle to perform safely under those limits. Now if we, as you say, don't feel comfortable, then we shouldn't do it. It's been my experience, if it's overloaded, it doesn't take long to get uncomfortable with driving it.
If you first have a vehicle, find a towable that fits within it's limits, you may have to compromise. If you have the towable first, find a vehicle with the capabilities to tow it.
People come here seeking knowledge from folks like engineers and others with experience. Most folks here seem to be looking for answers to their questions so they can make informed choices, I know that's what I'm looking for. If I'm looking for judgmental I will ask my wife. ;-)
I would offer more advice but the weight police have already come out, claiming I dont know the difference between dry weight, gvwr, gcvwr, tow capacities, engineering processes to determine specifications, etc.

Years ago I had long discussions with the weight police on a different forum. Everyone said I was crazy then when I was towing a 3500 pound tent trailer behind a jeep liberty rated to tow 5000 pounds. The argument back then was because of the liberty short wheel base it should never be used to tow a rv, regardless of jeep 5000 pound tow capacity. I towed that trailer for a few years, thousands and thousands of miles across oklahoma with no problems. The real kicker was when I was told that I shouldn't use a WDH on a liberty because they claimed the liberty was a unibody. The liberty owners manual clearly stated that towing a trailer over 2500 pounds with a WDH voided all warranties on the vehicle. I guess the weight police know better then Jeep engineers did back then.....
SRoberts, as a licensed engineer, most of us here should be asking you about weights and measures, I know I should.
Don't let the weight police get you down.
I agree with your disclaimer, and that if we stay at or under all weight rating limits we can reasonably expect that the OEM has engineered the vehicle to perform safely under those limits. Now if we, as you say, don't feel comfortable, then we shouldn't do it. It's been my experience, if it's overloaded, it doesn't take long to get uncomfortable with driving it.
If you first have a vehicle, find a towable that fits within it's limits, you may have to compromise. If you have the towable first, find a vehicle with the capabilities to tow it.
People come here seeking knowledge from folks like engineers and others with experience. Most folks here seem to be looking for answers to their questions so they can make informed choices, I know that's what I'm looking for. If I'm looking for judgmental I will ask my wife. ;-)
 

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There is a towing sub-forum where this thread should be moved to.
The gear ratio on the overland also hurts the overall tow rating similar to how much the stock Tacoma hunts for gears.
 

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2020 JT Overland; 2018 Grand Cherokee; 2004 Grand Cherokee Special Edition; 1970 Javelin(sold); 1973 Javelin; 1982 Eagle SX4
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Retired auto tech, frmr gov't ntwrk security admin
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There is a towing sub-forum where this thread should be moved to.
The gear ratio on the overland also hurts the overall tow rating similar to how much the stock Tacoma hunts for gears.
Gear ratio and axle width. Even my SILVERADO - the EXACT SAME TRUCK with the lower gear ratio axles had a higher tow rating number!
The SAME TRUCK - same weight, same engine, but different ratio, the towing capacity was higher on the sticker.
It's not just the weight of the vehicle or the capacity of the springs.......
I'm no expert - however, I've hauled tractors (IH 540, IH F20, etc.), tons (literally) of my antique engines, and my first flatbed trailer weighed more EMPTY than anyone's camper here does.
 
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gwpeaks

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Location
NC
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2020 Gladiator Overland
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Gear ratio and axle width. Even my SILVERADO - the EXACT SAME TRUCK with the lower gear ratio axles had a higher tow rating number!
The SAME TRUCK - same weight, same engine, but different ratio, the towing capacity was higher on the sticker.
It's not just the weight of the vehicle or the capacity of the springs.......
I'm no expert - however, I've hauled tractors (IH 540, IH F20, etc.), tons (literally) of my antique engines, and my first flatbed trailer weighed more EMPTY than anyone's camper here does.
I don't dispute any of what you're saying and I am 100% certain you know more than I about towing. I basically no nothing. I just can't get any concrete info as to whether a WDH will take care of the 200lbs I will be over my max payload with everyone in the truck. The dealers all say yes but looking online I've seen so much conflicting info it's impossible to know for sure. I'm supposed to either get the camper or not tomorrow.
 

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