NC_Overland

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Because people will buy it.
I doubt it will be higher than 10% and that might be generous.



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NC_Overland

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It’s how well it tows the 6k vrs the gasser. Rating doesn’t mean as much to me when the engine is screaming for mercy climbing a mountain or trying to get enough torque to pass a vehicle while towing in the 4k to 5k range. It’s been said many times that the diesel is not an economic choice but rather the ONLY factory choice for those who want torque. The gasser in the JT has an anemic 260 Ft of Max torque at 4400 RPM and that sucks compared vrs the 442 ft of Max torque at 1400 RPM in the diesel. I hated hearing my buddies JT revving up so hard while pulling around 5k that I knew I would only buy a JT with a diesel (I’m coming from V8s). Hearing how much non turbo V6s have to rev up compared to V8s or Turbo 6s is surprising. When you do a little research you realize the V6s in the midsize trucks are really just passenger car or minivan motors.
Wow. I was halfway with you until the end. I mean you sounded super condescending, but you weren’t that incorrect until the last sentence. We are spoiled these days but the horsepower and torque available and how durable these engines are compared to even 10-20 yrs ago. If diesels are so great then, why did a 3.6l V6/8 speed auto Colorado decimate the diesel Colorado’s gauntlet test numbers on the TFL truck’s testing? I towed 5-6k lbs fairly regularly with my 3.6l/8 speed Canyon and it did great. My father has over 100k flawless miles on his 2018 3.6l/8 speed Colorado and it has 5-6k lbs behind it several times a week. It has 100k miles on it because he tows a lot all over the country (avid classic car collector).

I’ll take that V6 for thousands less and way less expensive gas and maintenance. Talk to people who run fleets of HD trucks. A lot are switching back to gas because they are way cheaper to run and maintain.
 

Uparms

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Nice article, PICS and Videos are more valuable to us???

The writer dos need to get his Miata out of his butt??

""But for spirited drives on paved surfaces, spring rates and dampening could stand a tad more adjustment for both handling performance and driver/passenger comfort (think: Gladiator "Mojave").""

As a pickup, there are performance and capability criteria that are unique to Gladiator, and yes, it has already been recorded for the gas-powered rigs. The basics of interior cabin size and exterior physical dimensions are static. However, as fuel economy is most enthusiasts' leading interest, we're told the EcoDiesel JT pulls down 28 mpg on the highway, 22 mpg in city driving, and 24 mpg combined per the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (based on its 18.3-gallon tank). That's a major gain over the 3.6L Pentastar V-6 gasser's range. Diesel exhaust fluid is also a concern. The tank on these rigs holds 5.1 gallons of DEF.

Towing and payload maximums are two other updated stat lines. Ironically, the diesel-powered Gladiator Rubicon's towing is limited—by the vehicle's grille. Yes, the fascia's seven-slot grille actually restricts airflow to the Charge-Air Cooler, knocking the towing limit down to 6,000 pounds (6,500 pounds for lighter Sport and Overland models), from gas-unit's 7,650-pound capability. The Jeep's payload capacity also changes slightly depending on the configuration.

When it comes to the JT Rubicon's ability to carry, its 1,160-pound maximum wins over its gas counterpart (1,075 pounds).

2021 Jeep Gladiator Diesel
Base price: N/A
Price as tested: N/A
Engine: 3.0L EcoDiesel V-6
Transmission: 8HP75 eight-speed automatic
Horsepower: 260 hp @ 3,600 rpm
Torque: 442 lb-ft @ 1,400 rpm
Towing capacity: 6,500 pounds (Sport, Overland), 6,000 (Rubicon)
Payload: 1,160 pounds (Rubicon)
Estimated fuel economy: 22 mpg (city), 28 mpg (highway), 24 mpg (city and highway—EPA figure)
 

FLUndertaker

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The hay days of diesels are behind us. My last diesel was a ‘13 Cummins and it was bad. the crap the EPA now requires (DEF, reciculators, particulate filters, etc) and the penalties for deleting them has driven at least 50% of owners back to gas. Very few can justify it. Don’t get me wrong, 1000lbft torque from the factory is impressive but the cost of entry and maintenance is ridiculous coupled with the reduced life spans because of all the emissions crap. Ford is on the right track with the 7.3 Godzilla motor and others are bound to follow suit, hello TRex!.
 

TheSolarWizard

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Right. The beginning of it says it has the same D44 axles front and rear and 3.73 axles and 73:1 crawl ratio required by the Rubicon. So much wrong in that statement alone....
well I found out today that all diesels will be getting wide track axles and a limited slip. Crawl ratio obviously Sikkim vary vs the gasser
 

riggsdr

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We are spoiled these days but the horsepower and torque available and how durable these engines are compared to even 10-20 yrs ago.
I'd take the I-6 4.0L over the pentastar for reliability any day of the week and twice on Sunday. :angel:

Yes, diesels will be more expensive to buy and maintain. And granted, I've never driven one with the fancy exhaust gizmos; you bet your britches I'll be getting the longest warranty they let me buy.

But preferring a low-tourque gas to a diesel for towing? I don't see it.

Something I haven't heard anyone mention in all the discussions on here is the importance of exhaust temp on a diesel. Anyone who has driven diesels knows exhaust temp is what tells you how hard the engine is working. More important than coolant temp. With EGR, I can see how cooling could absolutely become a limiting factor while working the engine hard. The achilles heel is the emissions stuff.

But how it would handle load below maxing out cooling capacity? Maybe I'm a fool who doesn't know what he's talking about, but I have bet $4000 that the diesel will be worth it! (BTW, I drove a JL Diesel to make sure before I put the money down!)
 

BAT

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This is kind of like politics currently if your for Trump or Biden ain't no one changing your mind and if your for diesel or V6 ain't no one changing your mind till a V8 comes along
 

TheSolarWizard

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This is kind of like politics currently if your for Trump or Biden ain't no one changing your mind and if your for diesel or V6 ain't no one changing your mind till a V8 comes along
im actually not interested in a v8 gladiator. Sounds great but an all electric version that will embarrass it in every way won’t be that far away. Same reason I’ll be keepingmy order for either the Rivian, potentially the hummer or the cybertruck. The diesel is my last ICE engine period and any of those will Take the fun factor away from a V8

i have a performance model Y now and itll outrun any non exotic to about 90 mph and get over 100mpgE in the process
 
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Mr._Bill

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The hay days of diesels are behind us. My last diesel was a ‘13 Cummins and it was bad. the crap the EPA now requires (DEF, reciculators, particulate filters, etc) and the penalties for deleting them has driven at least 50% of owners back to gas. Very few can justify it. Don’t get me wrong, 1000lbft torque from the factory is impressive but the cost of entry and maintenance is ridiculous coupled with the reduced life spans because of all the emissions crap. Ford is on the right track with the 7.3 Godzilla motor and others are bound to follow suit, hello TRex!.
I had a 2006 Duramax diesel paired with an Allison transmission. It was the last year before all the restrictive emissions. It was the best running truck I ever had. The exhaust barely had an odor, once the engine was at operating temperature. All it needed was some outboard oil added to the fuel to keep the system lubricated and quiet. It had 140k miles and still running great when I traded it in for my Overland. Due to all the emissions crap, I would not want another diesel. I would go for a V8, if I needed to start towing. For now, the V6 is doing a great job.
 

lrtexasman

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32lbs of boost, 4500rpm redline, incredibly complex emissions system, Fiat engine with Jeep service... what could possibly go wrong.
i think the motor is fine but the emissions system is complex and I fully expect to have some growing pains.
 

lrtexasman

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Wow. I was halfway with you until the end. I mean you sounded super condescending, but you weren’t that incorrect until the last sentence. We are spoiled these days but the horsepower and torque available and how durable these engines are compared to even 10-20 yrs ago. If diesels are so great then, why did a 3.6l V6/8 speed auto Colorado decimate the diesel Colorado’s gauntlet test numbers on the TFL truck’s testing? I towed 5-6k lbs fairly regularly with my 3.6l/8 speed Canyon and it did great. My father has over 100k flawless miles on his 2018 3.6l/8 speed Colorado and it has 5-6k lbs behind it several times a week. It has 100k miles on it because he tows a lot all over the country (avid classic car collector).

I’ll take that V6 for thousands less and way less expensive gas and maintenance. Talk to people who run fleets of HD trucks. A lot are switching back to gas because they are way cheaper to run and maintain.
Sorry for the condescending tone. The V6s will tow to their ratings just hate that the engines are designed to have max torque at higher RPMs. The emissions changes have been problematic. I wish the big three would extend the 100k powertrain warranty to include the diesel emissions equipment as well.
 

Oilburner

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I’d be down for a twin turbo I6 (or I5) gas engine with torque below 5K rpm.
It will take 10 years or more to develop an electric platform that has tow range.
 

brianinca

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That last paragraph is SO TRUE. A good buddy of mine who is also my Jeep guru spent months searching for a V10 Excursion. This is a guy that ran Diesels for over a decade. He knows Diesels. He will never own another Diesel, but can't wait to get his hands on the new Ford 7.3 gasser. It was designed for forced induction as far as he's concerned, his "almost went to jail" car was a Fox body Mustang with WAY too much boost.

The company I work for has over 300 light trucks, two dedicated heavy Diesel mechanics (of the five), and we are buying gas 3/4 - 1T trucks now. The big Chevy V8's work just fine and go a jillion miles, the Hemi's are a little more problematic but Dodge guys love them. The 1/2 tons are mostly Fords. Our COO is a Ford guy, he dumped his super luxe 2008 F250 last year at 65K miles because it had an EXPENSIVE problem. His 2019 F250 was getting the tires rotated yesterday, Platinum 6.7l Powerstroke, but he's been buying gas Ford/Chevy/RAM pickups for the shop.

Obviously the heavies are all Diesel, but in CA this is a huge problem, we had to trade off our strongest tractor to a company in Idaho due to emissions. Doesn't do much good to have a truck that will run a million miles if it's too dirty for the State to license.

Complaining that a gas motor revs too high is funny, this isn't a flathead Ford - I love an engine that likes to rev.

Wow. I was halfway with you until the end. I mean you sounded super condescending, but you weren’t that incorrect until the last sentence. We are spoiled these days but the horsepower and torque available and how durable these engines are compared to even 10-20 yrs ago. If diesels are so great then, why did a 3.6l V6/8 speed auto Colorado decimate the diesel Colorado’s gauntlet test numbers on the TFL truck’s testing? I towed 5-6k lbs fairly regularly with my 3.6l/8 speed Canyon and it did great. My father has over 100k flawless miles on his 2018 3.6l/8 speed Colorado and it has 5-6k lbs behind it several times a week. It has 100k miles on it because he tows a lot all over the country (avid classic car collector).

I’ll take that V6 for thousands less and way less expensive gas and maintenance. Talk to people who run fleets of HD trucks. A lot are switching back to gas because they are way cheaper to run and maintain.
 

morejeepsthanicancount

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I quit reading after this line.

"All of the diesel Gladiators require the Dana 44/3.73:1 axles-and-gears package that is standard on Rubicon."
 

brianinca

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This writer needs a remedial class in reading the press release. He thinks the intercooler is why the payload rating dropped? Does he know the difference between that and a radiator?

OK, he doesn't understand the minutiae of the Max Tow vs Rubicon tow rating, but doesn't SOMEONE fact check this stuff?

Complaining about a pickup truck's handling on a windy mountain road is editorial, I get it, but basic facts as presented by the press packet shouldn't get fouled up like that.

Not sure if it’s been posted but here’s a review of the JT Diesel

http://www.trucktrend.com/features/2021-jeep-gladiator-rubicon-diesel-first-drive
 

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