Power inverter for Jeep Gladiator

JetSkiJeff

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That's what I would get, especially if electronic devices are going to be plugged into it.
that is what I thought as well. Of course if folks don't know is that Pure Sine Inverters are a tad pricey.. a "2000 Watt" Pure Sine inverter will run from around $300 on a no name model and upwards $$$$ depending on Brand.

Thanks for the input Mr Bill.. !
 

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I bought a pure shine wave inverter 1000 watt 2000 watt surge. from West Marine it is pricy but with electronics running
I did not want to take a risk. Looking at mounting under the back seat hopefully will work out every thing over Thanksgiving.
 

Mark Doiron

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I bought a pure shine wave inverter 1000 watt ...
I like the idea of a marine-certified inverter that outputs a sine wave. But, assuming 80% efficiency for the inverter, that's roughly 100 amps of current at 12.8 volts you need to wire up. I'll be interested in how you do that. Do you have (real) dual-batteries?
 

cgflyer

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just picked up the last one in stock at a local AA...in the reviews and questions online, it is said to be "modified sinewave" which I honestly don't know what that means...the question was asked if it was sine wave or square wave. Being that it was originally $267, is it possible that it is a pure sinewave inverter? I don't honestly even know what that means. I am assuming it has something to do with the current and possible spikes in wattage?
 

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The power relay for a winch is more than capable for any inverter that most people would install.
Would you say any winch? even a small ATV winch or would you start with something 5,000 lbs
 

JetSkiJeff

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just picked up the last one in stock at a local AA...in the reviews and questions online, it is said to be "modified sinewave" which I honestly don't know what that means...the question was asked if it was sine wave or square wave. Being that it was originally $267, is it possible that it is a pure sinewave inverter? I don't honestly even know what that means. I am assuming it has something to do with the current and possible spikes in wattage?

pure sine wave power flows in even, arching waves, whereas modified sine wave power flows to your devices in chunky, square waves. The square waves are giving power to your device “all or nothing,” so to speak. Your device will run properly, or not. The power is coming through in a less seamless fashion. Gaining power that is flowing in modified sine waves does not come through as clean and efficient—it doesn’t flow to the device as “pure.” The devices will get the power they need to operate, but when it comes to devices like fans, TV’s, radios and lights, they will tend to buzz, as they are running a bit “hotter,” due to the way power flows to them.

The cons of running your devices on modified sine wave power is that they will run less efficiently, which will commonly result in the device or appliance not running properly, interference or a “buzz”. For devices that aren’t sensitive, like a vacuum or water pump, it might not matter to you at all. They will use a little more wattage and make a little more noise. But, for devices that need an even flow of energy to function properly, like variable-speed power tools, you are going to get all or nothing. No matter how tightly or softly you pull on the trigger to your power drill, it is going to be full-speed or off. This doesn’t mean that a blender with different settings can’t be used at a high or low setting; it certainly can. But because they are getting energy that is less efficient, the devices you run on Modified Sine Wave power can wear out sooner than if they were constantly operating via pure sine wave power, like that supplied in homes.

Some devices and appliances that require a pure sine inverter are:

  • Microwaves
  • Laser printers
  • Variable speed tools
  • Cordless tool battery chargers
  • Some TV’s
  • Key Machines
  • CPAP machines with humidifiers
  • Medical equipment
  • Sensitive electronics
The main “pro” in running your devices on modified sine wave power is that the modified sine wave power inverter costs you less initially.

When considering pure sine wave DC to AC inverters vs. modified sine wave DC to AC inverters, the conversation can lead you into a geeky look into a side of electricity and power you never cared to see. However, consider the types of devices you’re running and weigh your options accordingly.
 

cgflyer

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pure sine wave power flows in even, arching waves, whereas modified sine wave power flows to your devices in chunky, square waves. The square waves are giving power to your device “all or nothing,” so to speak. Your device will run properly, or not. The power is coming through in a less seamless fashion. Gaining power that is flowing in modified sine waves does not come through as clean and efficient—it doesn’t flow to the device as “pure.” The devices will get the power they need to operate, but when it comes to devices like fans, TV’s, radios and lights, they will tend to buzz, as they are running a bit “hotter,” due to the way power flows to them.

The cons of running your devices on modified sine wave power is that they will run less efficiently, which will commonly result in the device or appliance not running properly, interference or a “buzz”. For devices that aren’t sensitive, like a vacuum or water pump, it might not matter to you at all. They will use a little more wattage and make a little more noise. But, for devices that need an even flow of energy to function properly, like variable-speed power tools, you are going to get all or nothing. No matter how tightly or softly you pull on the trigger to your power drill, it is going to be full-speed or off. This doesn’t mean that a blender with different settings can’t be used at a high or low setting; it certainly can. But because they are getting energy that is less efficient, the devices you run on Modified Sine Wave power can wear out sooner than if they were constantly operating via pure sine wave power, like that supplied in homes.

Some devices and appliances that require a pure sine inverter are:

  • Microwaves
  • Laser printers
  • Variable speed tools
  • Cordless tool battery chargers
  • Some TV’s
  • Key Machines
  • CPAP machines with humidifiers
  • Medical equipment
  • Sensitive electronics
The main “pro” in running your devices on modified sine wave power is that the modified sine wave power inverter costs you less initially.

When considering pure sine wave DC to AC inverters vs. modified sine wave DC to AC inverters, the conversation can lead you into a geeky look into a side of electricity and power you never cared to see. However, consider the types of devices you’re running and weigh your options accordingly.
Thank you! You list CPAP in your devices that require pure sine which is of interest to me...I was trying to figure out whether I would use my CPAP on my two month cross country in the spring. Is the factory install inverter pure sine?
 

JetSkiJeff

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Thank you! You list CPAP in your devices that require pure sine which is of interest to me...I was trying to figure out whether I would use my CPAP on my two month cross country in the spring. Is the factory install inverter pure sine?
Honestly I would doubt that it is Pure Sine Wave due to cost between Modified and Pure Sine Wave.
The cost of the optional package is so low that I would lean towards a regular Modified Sine Inverter installed on our Jeeps from factory.

The CPAP should still work .. as would many other Electronics like Laptops and other items requiring electricity but it puts the items at a risk of possible damage due to the power surges not flowing smooth.
 

rr11

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I like the idea of a marine-certified inverter that outputs a sine wave. But, assuming 80% efficiency for the inverter, that's roughly 100 amps of current at 12.8 volts you need to wire up. I'll be interested in how you do that. Do you have (real) dual-batteries?
The dual batteries are on my to do list. I am still working out the mount and hookup. I bought the inverter because it was on sale at West Marine. I have some time we will be making a trip out west next year and I will not need the inverter until then. I am thinking of under the rear seat mainly to use while we are on the road. My main use is for my wife's CPAP and I am leery of using it with a cheaper modified sine wave, that said I am not a electrical engineer just trying to avoid unexpected problems on the road.
 

Mark Doiron

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just picked up the last one in stock at a local AA...in the reviews and questions online, it is said to be "modified sinewave" which I honestly don't know what that means...
Here's a good article. Bear in mind that it's written for overseas where 240 volts is common house voltage. The RMS value referred to in one illustration is "root mean square". That refers to how that value is calculated ( 1/√2 times [Peak Voltage]) , but for our purposes, that's the value that a standard voltmeter would read (not the peak value, which you can see and read with an oscilloscope).

https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=https://www.rpc.com.au/pdf/sine_&_square_wave_electricity.pdf

Another thing worth noting as far as devices are rechargeable batteries for tools: A friend of mine takes care of people's vacation homes in his Oregon community. This includes tree trimming with a chainsaw. He uses a gas chain saw because he had trouble recharging batteries for electric ones he tried on his truck's inverter (If you watch my YouTube channel, he drives the two GMC pickups you've seen in some of my videos). I did a bit of research on this and found a few places on the net where this is discussed, but several different answers as to why. Bottom line is, if you plan to recharge a particular power tool battery on a particular inverter, it might be a good idea to ask the question (on Amazon, for instance).

As for me, I don't use rechargeable power tools, but have never had trouble recharging various Google phones (Nexus and Pixel), a Nexus 7, Canon camera batteries, a DJI drone, and a two Dell laptops. This is on a cheap inverter from Radio Shack that I found laying in my garage (my 2007 JK does not have a factory inverter, and on the inverter that came in the Gladiator. I suspect that Radio Shack inverter is square wave--maybe later today (after sunrise, LOL) I'll take my meter out there and have a gander at the waveform (it has an oscilloscope function). I'll stick it on the Gladiator too, to see what type of waveform it outputs.
 
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