4XE hybrid for the Gladiator ? ? ?

CrazyCooter

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tony
Joined
Nov 1, 2020
Messages
129
Reaction score
54
Location
Redding, Ca
Vehicle(s)
2006 Ram 3500 DRW 1991 JEEP YJ
The gas engine is augmented by electric motor(s?) that’s what gives it more hp/tq vs just the 2.0 alone. Have not heard Anything about ‘how well’ this system can tow, only that tow rating for the hybrid Wrangler is the same as regular Wranglers.
Ya, battery would probably be dead within 25 miles of out home town and then the ice engine would be on its own again. This is why Id like to see the technology combined with the ecodiesel so one could have it all.





Advertisement

 

aldo98229

Well-Known Member
First Name
Aldo
Joined
Dec 21, 2020
Messages
85
Reaction score
166
Location
Bellingham, WA
Vehicle(s)
2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, 2018 Fiat 124 Spider Abarth
Occupation
Market Research
Vehicle Showcase
1
I read awhile ago that Toyota reportedly explored using diesel in hybrids.

Turns out, because the ICE motor plays mostly a supporting/generator role in a hybrid, diesel makes little difference in MPG. When they took into account the added cost and weight, diesel made little sense.
 

Sazabi19

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2020
Messages
404
Reaction score
453
Location
USA
Vehicle(s)
2014 Kia Cadenza, 2020 Jeep Gladiator JT Sport S
The gas engine is augmented by electric motor(s?) that’s what gives it more hp/tq vs just the 2.0 alone. Have not heard Anything about ‘how well’ this system can tow, only that tow rating for the hybrid Wrangler is the same as regular Wranglers.
I thought it was just a little initial grunt that it gave when taking off and that was it.
 

jurfie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
1,263
Reaction score
1,493
Location
Vancouver, BC
Vehicle(s)
2014 Granite Crystal Metallic JKR; 2016 Daytona Grey Audi A5 Competition Package
Ya, battery would probably be dead within 25 miles of out home town and then the ice engine would be on its own again. This is why Id like to see the technology combined with the ecodiesel so one could have it all.
No offence, but I don’t think you understand how hybrids work.
 

ShadowsPapa

Well-Known Member
First Name
Bill
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
7,199
Reaction score
5,884
Location
Runnells, Iowa
Vehicle(s)
2020 JT Overland; 2018 Grand Cherokee; 2004 Grand Cherokee Special Edition; 1970 Javelin(sold); 1973 Javelin; 1982 Eagle SX4
Occupation
Retired auto tech, frmr gov't ntwrk security admin
Vehicle Showcase
3
No offence, but I don’t think you understand how hybrids work.
When I worked for the state, they had several hybrid vehicles we used to travel between offices for IT work. First time I pulled up to a stop sign and that engine shut off......... LOL but man those things had zip.
 

CrazyCooter

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tony
Joined
Nov 1, 2020
Messages
129
Reaction score
54
Location
Redding, Ca
Vehicle(s)
2006 Ram 3500 DRW 1991 JEEP YJ
No offence, but I don’t think you understand how hybrids work.
Um ya, pretty sure I do.

9% grade to head east out of our town. If electric motors assist the ice like I read they do and assuming the estimated 25 mile at best range on electric mode the literature quotes......The batteries would be dead in short order if a person was towing and trying to maintain the speed limit. You would be back down to just the ice to propel the vehicle till the road leveled or went downhill to recharge the batteries again.
 

Oilburner

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Messages
904
Reaction score
1,142
Location
Nowhere, AR
Vehicle(s)
1982 Scrambler, 1969 Wagoneer, 2020 JLUR Ecodiesel
One thing I haven’t figured out = are the hp/tq numbers based on the ICE + electric motors, OR is it based on running on battery power alone? (Which would last about 10 miles towing here I bet)
 

jurfie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
1,263
Reaction score
1,493
Location
Vancouver, BC
Vehicle(s)
2014 Granite Crystal Metallic JKR; 2016 Daytona Grey Audi A5 Competition Package
9% grade to head east out of our town.
See, now that’s a little bit of relevant information you left out of your original post. The way you presented your post came across as fact for everyone, rather than for your particular circumstances.

So yes; for you or others who live in an area with long steep uphills, the 4XE is probably not the best choice if you tow often.

But even if the towing capacity of the (eventual) Gladiator 4XE is the same as the Wrangler, it will suffice for many people.
 

Oilburner

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tim
Joined
Jun 8, 2018
Messages
904
Reaction score
1,142
Location
Nowhere, AR
Vehicle(s)
1982 Scrambler, 1969 Wagoneer, 2020 JLUR Ecodiesel
But even if the towing capacity of the (eventual) Gladiator 4XE is the same as the Wrangler, it will suffice for many people.
I try to avoid saying ‘never’ but I’m pretty darned sure Jeep would not ever sell a JT that couldn’t tow at least 5-6K. They would be the laughingstock of the mid-size pickup world.
 

jurfie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
1,263
Reaction score
1,493
Location
Vancouver, BC
Vehicle(s)
2014 Granite Crystal Metallic JKR; 2016 Daytona Grey Audi A5 Competition Package
I try to avoid saying ‘never’ but I’m pretty darned sure Jeep would not ever sell a JT that couldn’t tow at least 5-6K. They would be the laughingstock of the mid-size pickup world.
I’d be surprised if it wasn’t more than the Wrangler, but I wonder if the limitation would be the 2.0L.
 

Sank

New Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2020
Messages
3
Reaction score
4
Location
Colorado
Vehicle(s)
LJ
Um ya, pretty sure I do.

9% grade to head east out of our town. If electric motors assist the ice like I read they do and assuming the estimated 25 mile at best range on electric mode the literature quotes......The batteries would be dead in short order if a person was towing and trying to maintain the speed limit. You would be back down to just the ice to propel the vehicle till the road leveled or went downhill to recharge the batteries again.
If you have followed the wrangler 4xe, you see it has electric-only mode, gas-only mode, and hybrid (default). When in hybrid, i'm pretty sure it's only used for starting from a stop (accelerating is where cars lose their gas mileage), and when at cruising speed only the gasoline power is operational. So, no. It's extremely unlikely that they'd burn all your propulsion battery when driving over the mountain passes, unless you're the kind of guy that has your foot on the floor going maximum speed and you can't click the "gas only" button.
 

Sank

New Member
Joined
Jul 10, 2020
Messages
3
Reaction score
4
Location
Colorado
Vehicle(s)
LJ
As for solar panels to power the vehicle for overland, the solar guy has it right. Figure the battery is 17 kWh capacity, and it gets you 25 miles. Then figure you have 1 kW of solar panels (3 full size solar modules) that have to be in perfect sunlight for 17 hours to charge that battery. So if you're in Arizona and drive only 25 miles per day, then yes you can overland it. :- )
 

CrazyCooter

Well-Known Member
First Name
Tony
Joined
Nov 1, 2020
Messages
129
Reaction score
54
Location
Redding, Ca
Vehicle(s)
2006 Ram 3500 DRW 1991 JEEP YJ
As for solar panels to power the vehicle for overland, the solar guy has it right. Figure the battery is 17 kWh capacity, and it gets you 25 miles. Then figure you have 1 kW of solar panels (3 full size solar modules) that have to be in perfect sunlight for 17 hours to charge that battery. So if you're in Arizona and drive only 25 miles per day, then yes you can overland it. :- )
Except you will probably never get a full day at 100% from solar panels. Figure 80% output and 5.5 hours annual average at my 40.6° latitude....Thats 4 days for a full change give or take depending on the season. Tilt the panels for a little more output...... Obviously it's not feasible.

If you are traveling at the equator and temps are below freezing, the panels would perform well? That condition is never going to happen!

Being plugged in to the grid powered by coal fired generators is the most efficient.....Oh the hipocracy!
 

jurfie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
1,263
Reaction score
1,493
Location
Vancouver, BC
Vehicle(s)
2014 Granite Crystal Metallic JKR; 2016 Daytona Grey Audi A5 Competition Package
Except you will probably never get a full day at 100% from solar panels. Figure 80% output and 5.5 hours annual average at my 40.6° latitude....Thats 4 days for a full change give or take depending on the season. Tilt the panels for a little more output...... Obviously it's not feasible.

If you are traveling at the equator and temps are below freezing, the panels would perform well? That condition is never going to happen!
I think that's his point; theoretically in perfect conditions: yes; in practicality: no. At least not until solar panels are more efficient.

Being plugged in to the grid powered by coal fired generators is the most efficient.....Oh the hipocracy!
*sigh*...not everywhere uses coal fired generators. Where is does, sure that argument has merit, but where other clean energy sources are used exclusively or at least in part, electric vehicles make sense; PHEVs even more so for those times you can't rely on full electric.
 

ShadowsPapa

Well-Known Member
First Name
Bill
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
7,199
Reaction score
5,884
Location
Runnells, Iowa
Vehicle(s)
2020 JT Overland; 2018 Grand Cherokee; 2004 Grand Cherokee Special Edition; 1970 Javelin(sold); 1973 Javelin; 1982 Eagle SX4
Occupation
Retired auto tech, frmr gov't ntwrk security admin
Vehicle Showcase
3
I think that's his point; theoretically in perfect conditions: yes; in practicality: no. At least not until solar panels are more efficient.



*sigh*...not everywhere uses coal fired generators. Where is does, sure that argument has merit, but where other clean energy sources are used exclusively or at least in part, electric vehicles make sense; PHEVs even more so for those times you can't rely on full electric.
Doesn't matter the type - we don't have the CAPACITY to keep 100% electric vehicles plugged in and recharging. The infrastructure just isn't there, and it's especially apparent in, gasp, of all places, the place that's close to banning ICE, California. Ask some of them about their blackouts - not due to an accident or fool hitting a power pole.
The head of Toyota and of Tesla even agree - their comments are out there. Toyota doesn't care, they don't give a rip - they'll sell vehicles either way no matter what and maintain a huge market share - their thing is that the world isn't ready to go electric due to lack of capacity. It just doesn't exist, and less so in places that would use it the most.

https://observer.com/2020/12/toyota-akio-toyoda-electric-vehicle-japan-transition/

https://www.wsj.com/articles/toyotas-chief-says-electric-vehicles-are-overhyped-11608196665

Musk has said basically the same thing......... the world is not ready in capacity and the auto industry will be in tatters.
Then we get to the - what's the environmental COST of producing and recycling all of those batteries?? What's it cost in clean water, air, and ground? Right now some are saying it's actually just as harmful to go electric.
We love to gloss over the real costs (not just $$) of going all electric or even hybrid too fast with today's technology. There's an environmental impact to be honestly looked at, not all are convinced.
 

Advertisement




 



Advertisement
Top