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Motor oil and filter recommendations for EcoDiesel JT?

ShadowsPapa

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If that information is clear to me, I was referring to the brand of oil since there are several which would be the best
That's what I was saying - whatever brand the person answering is using is the best. The answers will be all over the map.
And making it even harder, engineering wear tests show that Brand A's XYZ viscosity is among the best but drop to a slightly different viscosity and suddenly Brand B's is best.
So it's really hard to make a blanket statement.
What I use in my performance engine - my 73 Javelin - is going to be a lot different than what I use in my Gladiator gas engine. The best at the viscosity for that built 360 isn't the best for the 3.6

Diesels will likely be similar.

Pick a top brand that meets these specs and you can't go wrong -

Jeep Gladiator Motor oil and filter recommendations for EcoDiesel JT? 1672164133347


Just for kicks - here's a really good oil, but not to be used with engines equipped with DPF -
5W30 Amsoil Series 3000 Heavy Duty Diesel Oil synthetic
(I picked one with the wrong viscosity anyway, but the point was - it's not to be used with the JT diesel. So do not use that one - Amsoil "heavy duty" diesel oil seems to be aimed at non-DPF big rigs, tractors, etc. and if I still had my diesel tractors, for the extra 11% it costs over other oils, I'd be tempted.)

I no longer own any diesel equipment, and finding GOOD engineering data that's factual and not "because I use it it must be the best", or anecdotal is tough, but what I have seen may indicate Amsoil diesel oil to be decent.
There will be others, and maybe some that are better, but the results are good and when a guy testing makes a comment such as "in this case their hype is correct" then he's really saying something LOL.

And as others will likely state - don't try to set a record for the most miles driven on an oil change and using any of the top few oils will get you far.
 

kevman65

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LOL - just the title made me cringe. Oh, no, not another best spark plug, best religion, best steak dinner, best beer, best dog breed.........




No. They are actually analyzed by labs hired to do the analysis to get their certification. the labs send people out into the consumer areas - buy oil off the shelf either from stores, dealers, or oil change places, take it back and literally do analyze it. Seen the methods they use and walked through the processes.
To get oil certified is dirt cheap. Only people worried or trying to save a handful of pennies would skip the process or maybe they don't care because they already sell enough. It's not money - it's cheap.
I will only run certified oil because I know it's been tested and proven to meet the minimums.



Typically a good idea.



I've talked to the people at Wix - and they say "made to the specs given to Wix"
The building and people Wix pays makes the filters but NOT to wix specs - they are made to MOPAR specs, Ford specs, whatever. Even Mobil has their own specs they give Wix.
I called for support and the guy was really friendly and not in a hurry to get off the line. I bet we chatted for 10-15 minutes about this topic.
MOPAR doesn't put their name on a wix filter, Wix makes filters according to the specifications and requirements MOPAR gives them.
My father worked in a factory where they made products they sold under their own name, and they made products for others sold under those other names. He said they came in with their own people, inspected things, checked out the employees, looked over all the records and such, and were very specific on how things were to be done.

Follow the freakin' damned book. Ya think "forum people" know more than those who designed the engine and WARRANT it?
"what's the best (insert item here)" will always be opinion unless someone supports it with some proven repeatable fact/test.
"I have 100,000 miles on my truck so I know the oil I use is best" is also bull.
Go back and talk to the people at Wix again. Ask them if their part number crosses over to MOPAR (as they advertise by the way) Instead of presenting just one side of an argument present the entire argument. Why make two exact same filters with different part numbers when you make the same one and the part number depends on what box it goes in.

"Follow the damned book" is hilarious from someone who makes their money rebuilding old parts to be new again with parts that are not from "the damned book".

If you really believe that top line filters and oils are worse than what MOPAR puts their name on, then you are as senile as you act sometimes.

But hey, everyone do what Bill says because he uses a thesaurus to produce encyclopedia length responses to any question.


To anyone that can think for themselves, if you buy quality filters and oil that is less expensive than OEM, then do it.

Remember this guy (Bill) is the same one that was preaching AGAINST OEM spark plugs a couple of days ago. He flip flops more than Jimmy Buffet in Margaritaville.
 

BearFootSam

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Hootbro

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If that information is clear to me, I was referring to the brand of oil since there are several which would be the best
There really is no "best" of any oil that meets and carries the licensed MS spec for the diesel oil, just a bunch of anecdotal opinions and brand biases. Pick any one and you will be fine.

Oil threads of asking for the "best" just most times turn into dick sword fighting and bunch of people saying you are doing it wrong no matter the brand you settle on.
 

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ShadowsPapa

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Remember this guy (Bill) is the same one that was preaching AGAINST OEM spark plugs a couple of days ago. He flip flops more than Jimmy Buffet in Margaritaville.
Since when was I "preaching against OEM spark plugs" ??
I was merely saying there are other options. Go back and read - I never said anything against the champion plugs. I was saying that the BS about "autolite can't be used" (or should not be used) because Ford used them was bunk. People here have used Autolite plugs just fine. I have actually tended to use Champion as first choice in most of my vehicles unless I find a problem or a plug that matches that engine's personality better. Never said a thing against Champion.

Go back and talk to the people at Wix again. Ask them if their part number crosses over to MOPAR (as they advertise by the way)
Sure, they may cross over. Heck, you can buy Walmart branded filters that cross, AC, Bosch, Motorcraft, NAPA, O'Reilly and more that cross over.
"Will fit" doesn't mean "the same inside". Been in the business too long to believe "if it fits, it must be the same". Filter media, pleats, micron size, how well the media is secured inside, location of the valve, thickness of the housing and more.
There can be differences in the filter material, number of pleats, location of bypass valves and other differences. Makes no sense to say that because it crosses or will fit that it's the same thing.
Take a few apart.
One brand that fits may filter 99% of 20 micron particles while another made in the same building filters 30 micron particles (a cheaper priced filter, made in the same place)
Both "fit". But are they the same?

Example -
– Ford Motorcraft Oil Filter FL-500S, .5 quart capacity, bypass valve rating = 8 psi

– Ford Motorcraft Oil Filter FL-820S, .7 quart capacity, bypass valve rating = 16 psi

– Ford Racing Performance Parts (FRPP) # CM-6731-FL820, .7 quart capacity, bypass valve rating = 16 psi
All three were made in the same place.

There are numerous cars and trucks that can use any of those 3 oil filters.
All 3 fit, but not all are the same in capability.

Reviewer's comments on Wix and MOPAR filter comparison -

Wix -
Outer casing wall thickness = .013″
This filter holds about .36 of a quart of oil.
Its filter media provides a respectable 112 square inches of filtering surface area.
Filter media was NOT glued well to its end caps at all locations

MOPAR -
Outer casing wall thickness = .013″
This filter holds about .36 of a quart of oil.
Its filter media provides a respectable 117 square inches of filtering surface area.
This oil filter is made with quality parts. Its filter media is glued well to its end caps.

Made in the same place.


"Follow the damned book" is hilarious from someone who makes their money rebuilding old parts to be new again with parts that are not from "the damned book".
Really? Looks like genuine OEM replacement parts to me.
I've spent thousands to be able to duplicate the original plating and other finishes.
Now you're reaching.
Can't see how restoration has any connection with using what's recommended in the owners manual for a new vehicle. How does it compare? In 50 years you won't be able to get original parts for the JT very easily so let's compare apples to apples. Restoration of antiques for which you can't get parts (and yet - I have 'em) or for a new vehicle for which parts are freely available. Quite a stretch comparing the two, isn't it?
I have original New Old Stock (NOS) parts for Motorola, Prestolite., AMC and others.
I use factory style crimps on direct factory style replacement terminals on the wires.
(this is a tiny fraction of the parts I have)
Jeep Gladiator Motor oil and filter recommendations for EcoDiesel JT? 20190512_154828_HDR

Jeep Gladiator Motor oil and filter recommendations for EcoDiesel JT? 20190512_154846_HDR



If you really believe that top line filters and oils are worse than what MOPAR puts their name on, then you are as senile as you act sometimes.
Yes, oils like Valvoline, certain viscosities and oils from Amsoil are down the line below the MOPAR/Pennzoil oils, certain NAPA oils are down the line below the Pennzoil oils,
If you read real test data, you'll find that some of "your favorite brands" are worse for protection.
Do the research. For the viscosity required for the gas 3.6, just for example, those that come out on top are Pennzoil, QS and Amsoil. Some of the others that are favorites don't fair quite as well. Still "ok" or even very good - but it's a fact that some oils don't offer the same protection, "top line" or not.
Pick on Amsoil - a pretty steady top 5 for gas engine oils. Good wear testing, good resistance to extreme pressures, decent at handling temperatures, but their hypoid gear lube is horribly rated.
"top line" means nothing.
At this point, Quaker State and Amsoil are tops for gas engines.
If I was "oil shopping" today for oil for a 3.6, I'd choose Quaker State, Amsoil or Pennzoil.
Amsoil doesn't have their oil of this viscosity AP certified, but claim it meets or exceeds 6A and SP
But some of the "top line" oils out there are waaay down the list and yes are worse than what MOPAR has made for them.
With risk of LSPI and other issues, for GAS engines, only use anything ILSAC GF-6A and API SP
Today, some oils cause more carbon build-up than others, another factor to consider.

To anyone that can think for themselves, if you buy quality filters and oil that is less expensive than OEM, then do it.
That's a hoot - define "quality". Your favorite brand, regardless of the ability to fight LSPI, or handle extreme temperatures, or wear protection? Does a specific brand always mean best quality?
People seem to think "Royal Purple" is a top quality brand, but why is it near the bottom of the list for ability to protect against wear?

Brand loyalty is a thing of the past. Right now, today, at least for GAS engines, QS, Amsoil and Pennzoil in the viscosities for the GAS JT are tops.
Diesel - Amsoil. (among others, I don't do as much research into diesel oil any more)

I was expecting all this, though, because he's hated my guts since day one. No ability to handle people who are "different" or who disagree.
 
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DylanM

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Owner's manual page 393:
" We recommend you use 5W-40 synthetic engine oil such as Mopar® that meets the manufacturer Material Standard MS-12991 and the API SN engine oil category is required. "
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